Meet Joseph [Genesis 38-40]

Hello, Scroll Eaters! There are dozens of things we could talk about in meeting Joseph. But the one I want to look today is a pattern that we see in the remainder of Genesis and in Daniel. God gives Joseph the ability to interpret dreams. What’s interesting is that he then put Joseph into position to interpret dreams, and specifically, the dreams of Pharoah. Daniel’s story is the same, but the dreamer is Nebuchadnezzar. Notice a few things. In both instances, a Hebrew is sent to a foreign power, interprets dreams, and becomes second-in-command to the leader of the nation. In both instances, God sends dreams to a pagan, who then has to go do a follower of the true God to get the dreams interpreted. In both instances, God is actually in the process of preserving his people from a threatening situation. With Joseph, God is about to preserve his people from a plague. With Daniel, God is preserving his people while in exile.

As a general rule, God sends dreams to pagans and they have to be interpreted by believers. Non-biblical instances include EmperorĀ Constantine, King Clovis, and innumerable accounts of Christian missionaries being approached by Muslims, tribesman, and pantheists asking to have their vision of Christ explained.

So why, as a general rule, doesn’t God give visions to his followers? Simple. He gave us his words instead. He gave us the prophets, the authors of Scripture. Finally, he gave us his Son. The words are better than the visions.

Tomorrow we read Genesis 41-43.

The Lord bless you and keep you.

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This entry was posted in Bible, Bible 2011, Bible Reading, Bible Reading Plan, Christian, Christianity, Histories, Law, Old Testament, Pentateuch, Religion, Theology, Torah and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Meet Joseph [Genesis 38-40]

  1. Pete says:

    Oops! Ignore the second part of my earlier comment….I just realized it is at the end of the daily posting…..just a little hard to find. <

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